Keeping the Fiction Flowing

As I announced in my last blog post, I’m starting to publish all of my fiction through Patreon.

There are two books I’m actively publishing right now:

  • NAPE – a sci-fi story featuring a missing artificial intelligence.
  • Kings Courier – a fantasy featuring a boy who is a courier and gets pulled into a deeper role than he ever expected.

In case you’ve already missed the previous instalments:

NAPE

Kings Courier

Of course, you can head to Patreon and sign up for the regular updates over there.

 

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2015 is that way, 2016 is this way

The last year has been something of a change in direction in my life. Not only was it a year of a large number of ‘firsts’ for me, in all sorts of ways, I also changed a lot of what I was doing to better suit me. Actually that’s really important.

2015 turned out to be a really significant year for me, not because of any huge life changes, but because so many different and interesting things happened to me

What did I change?

‘Official’ Studying – I have for many years been doing a degree in Psychology with the Open University. I was actually on my last year – well, 20 months as it was part time. I had my final two modules to go, and although I was hugely enjoying the course, it was a major sap on my personal time; what little I have of it after work and other obligations (see below). I also reached a crunch point; due to the way the course worked, changes in the rules, and the duration of the work (I started studying back in 2007), I had to finish the course by June 2016, and that meant there were no opportunities for retakes or doing the entire course all over again. I either had to get it right, first time, for each remaining course, or I would have to start again. That kept the pressure on me to get good marks massive when I have a very busy day job, and it got harder to dedicate the required time. In the end I decided that having the piece of paper was less important than having the personal interest in the topic. And that was the other of problem. I’d already stopped reading, I stopped playing games, I stopped going out, all to complete a course. I realised that my interest in Psychology wont disappear just because I stop studying. I can still read the books, magazines, articles that interest me without feeling pressured to do so.

Book/Article Writing – Given the above, the lack of activity on here, it wont surprise you that writing books and articles was something else I stopped. I deliberately changed my focus to the Psychology degree. But I also stopped doing anything outside work in any of the areas I’m interested in, despite some offers. I was working on a book, actually two books, but ultimately dropped them due to other pressures. Hopefully I’ll be converting some of that material into posts here over the course of the year.

Working Hours – I have very strange sleep patterns; I sleep very little, and have done since the day I was born. As such that means I normally get up very early (2am is not unusual) having gone to bed at 10 or 11pm the previous night. However, last I spent even more time up late on the phone with meetings and phone calls to people in California. That would make for a long day, so I switched my day entirely so that I now start working later and finish later, doing most of my personal stuff in the early morning. It’s nice and quiet then to.

2015 Firsts

  • First time staying in a B&B – I know, this seems like an odd, but I have honestly never stayed in a B&B before. But I did, three times, while on a wonderful touring holiday of the North of Scotland, taking in Inverness, Skye, Loch Ness and many other places.
  • First touring holiday (road trip) – See above. For the first time ever, I didn’t go to one place, stay there, and travel around the area. We drove miles. In fact, I did about 2,800 over the course of a week.
  • First time to the very north of Scotland – Part of the same road trip. I’ve done Dunbar, North Berwick, the borders, Edinburgh.
  • First music concert (in ages) – I went to two, in fact. One in Malaga and one in San Francisco about two weeks later. Enjoyed both. Want to do more.
  • First time driving in the US – I’ve been regularly going to the US since 2003, when I first started working Microsoft, and even for companies in Silicon Valley, I’ve always taken rides from friends, or taxis. In April, I hired a car and drove around. A lot. I did about 600 miles over the course of two weeks.
  • First Spanish train journey – I flew to Madrid on business, and then took the train from there down to see a friend in Malaga. The AVE train is lovely, and a beautiful way to travel, especially at 302km/h.
  • First Cruise – I’ve wanted to go on a cruise to see the Fjords of Norway since I was a teenager. I love the cold, I love the idea of being relatively isolated on a boat with lots of time to myself. In the end, I spent way more time interacting with other people than I expected, and did so little on my own, but I wouldn’t have changed it for the world. I went from Bergen to Kirkenes in the Arctic circle and back on the Hurtigruten and it was one of the most amazing trips of my life.
  • First time travelling on my own not for business – I travel so much for work (I did 16 journeys in 2015, most to California) it made a nice, if weird, change to do s full trip on my own. I enjoyed it immensely and recommend it to everybody.

What’s planned for 2016?

I’m starting to publish my fictional work on Patreon with the express intention of getting book content that I’ve been working on for many many years out there in front of other people. I’ve got detailed notes and outlines on about nine different fictional titles, crossing a range of different genres. I’ve started with two of my larger ‘worlds’ – NAPE and Kings Courier and will be following up with regular chapters and content over the coming months.

I’ve also created a new blog to capture all of my travel. Not the work stuff, but things like the Scotland tour and the Norwegian Cruise, plus whatever else comes up this year and beyond. Current thoughts are Antartica, Alaska or Iceland, work and personal commitments permitting. Plus I’m in Spain in August with my family and friends.

Converting my unfinished technical books to blog posts. I’ve worked on a number of books, some of which contain fresh, brand new material I’d like to share with other people, including the book content I was working on last year. I’m still trying to reformat it for the blog so that it looks good, but I will get there.

Posted in Books, Coalface, Commentary, General

Process home monitoring data using the Time Series Database in Bluemix

I keep a lot of information about my house – I have had sensors and recording units in various parts of my house years, recording info through a variety of different devices.

Over the years I’ve built a number of different solutions for storing and displaying the information, and when the opportunity came up to write about a database built specifically for recording this information I jumped at the change, and this is what I came up with:

As home automation increases, so does the number of sensors recording statistics and information needed to feed that data. Using the Time Series Database in BlueMix makes it easy to record the time-logged data and query and report on it. In this tutorial, we’ll examine how to create, store, and, ultimately, report on information by using the Time Series Database. We’ll also use the database to correlate data points across multiple sensors to track the effectiveness of heating systems in a multi-zone house.

You can read the full article here

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Office 365 Activation Wont Accept Password

So today I signed up for Office 365, since it seemed to be the easiest way to get hold of Office; although I have a license and subscription, I also have more machines.

To say I was frustrated when I tried to activate Office 365 was an understatement. Each time I went through the process, it would reject the password saying there was a problem with my account.

I could login with my email and password online, but through the activation, no dice. Some internet searches, including with the ludicrously bad Windows support search didn’t elicit anything useful.

Then it hit me. Office 2011 for Mac through an Office 365 subscription probably doesn’t know about secondary authentication.

Sure enough, I created and application specific password, logged in with that, and yay, I now have a running Office 365 subscription.

If you are experiencing the same problem, using a application specific password might just help you out.

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Hadoop BoF Session at OSCON

I have a BoF session next week at OSCON next week:

Migrating Data from MySQL and Oracle into Hadoop

The session is at 7pm Tuesday night – look for rooms D135 and/or D137/138.

Correction: We are now in  E144 on Tuesday with the Hadoop get together first at 7pm, and the Data Migration to follow at 8pm.

I’m actually going to be joined by Gwen Shapira from Cloudera, who has a BoF session on Hadoop next door at the same time, along with Eric Herman from Booking.com. We’ll use the opportunity to talk all things Hadoop, but particularly the ingestion of data from MySQL and other databases into the Hadoop datastore.

As always, it’d be great to meet anybody interested in Hadoop at the BoF, please come along and introduce yourselves, and hopefully I’ll see you next week!

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Making Real-Time Analytics a Reality — TDWI -The Data Warehousing Institute

My article on how to make the real-time processing of information from traditional transactional stores into Hadoop a reality has been published over at TDWI:

Making Real-Time Analytics a Reality — TDWI -The Data Warehousing Institute.

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Replicating Oracle Webinar Question Follow-up

We had really great webinar on Replicating to/from Oracle earliest this month, and you can view the recording of that Webinar here.

A good sign of how great a Webinar was is the questions that come afterwards, and we didn’t get through them all. so here are all the questions and answers for the entire webinar.

Q: What is the overhead of Replicator on source database with asynchronous CDC?

A: With asynchronous operation there is no substantial CPU overhead (as with synchronous), but the amount of generated redo logs becomes bigger requiring more disk space and better log management to ensure that the space is used effectively.

Q: Do you support migration from Solaris/Oracle to Linux/Oracle?

A: The replication is not certified for use on Solaris, however, it is possible to configure a replicator to operate remotely and extract from a remote Oracle instance. This is achieved by installing Tungsten Replicator on Linux and then extracting from the remote Oracle instance.

Q: Are there issues in supporting tables without Primary Keys on Oracle to Oracle replication?

A: Non-primary key tables will work, but it is not recommended for production as it implies significant overhead when applying to a target database.

Q: On Oracle->Oracle replication, if there are triggers on source tables, how is this handled?

A: Tungsten Replicator does not automatically disable triggers. The best solution is to remove triggers on slaves, or rewrite triggers to identify whether a trigger is being executed on the master or slave and skip it accordingly, although this requires rewriting the triggers in question.

Q: How is your offering different/better than Oracle Streams replication?

A: We like to think of ourselves as GoldenGate without the price tag. The main difference is the way we extract the information from Oracle, otherwise, the products offer similar functionality. For Tungsten Replicator in particular, one advantage is the open and flexible nature, since Tungsten Replicator is open source, released under a GPL V2 license, and available at https://code.google.com/p/tungsten-replicator/.

Q: How is the integrity of the replica maintained/verified?

A: Replicator has built-in real-time consistency checks: if an UPDATE or DELETE doesn’t update any rows, Replicator will go OFFLINE:ERROR, as this indicates an inconsistent dataset.

Q: Can configuration file based passwords be specified using some form of encrypted value for security purposes to keep them out of the clear?

A: We support an INI file format so that you do not have to use the command-line installation process. There is currently no supported option for an encrypted version of these values, but the INI file can be secured so it is only readable by the Tungsten user.

Q: Our source DB is Oracle RAC with ~10 instances. Is coherency maintained in the replication from activity in the various instances?

A: We do not monitor the information that has been replicated; but CDC replicates row-based data, not statements, so typical sequence insertion issues that might occur with statement based replication should not apply.

Q: Is there any maintenance of Oracle sequence values between Oracle and replicas?

A: Sequence values are recorded into the row data as extracted by Tungsten Replicator. Because the inserted values, not the sequence itself, is replicated, there is no need to maintain sequences between hosts.

Q: How timely is the replication? Particularly for hot source tables receiving millions of rows per day?

A: CDC is based on extracting the data at an interval, but the interval can be configured. In practice, assuming there are regular inserts and updates on the Oracle side, the data is replicated in real-time. See https://docs.continuent.com/tungsten-replicator-3.0/deployment-oracle-cdctuning.html for more information on how this figure can be tuned.

Q: Can parallel extractor instances be spread across servers rather than through threads on the same server (which would be constrained by network or HBA)?

A: Yes. We can install multiple replicators and tune the extraction of the parallel extractor accordingly. However, that selection would need to be manual, but certainly that is possible.

Q: Do you need the CSV file (to select individual tables with the setupCDC.sh configuration) on the master setup if you want all tables?

A: No.

Q: If you lose your slave down the road, do you need to re-provision from the initial SCN number or is there a way to start from a later point?

A: This is the reason for the THL Sequence Number introduced in the extractor. If you lose your slave, you can install a new slave and have it start at the transaction number where the failed slave stopped if you know it, since the information will be in the THL. If not, you can usually determine this by examining the THL directly. There should be no need to re-provision – just to restart from the transaction in the THL on the master.

Q: Regarding a failed slave, what if it failed such that we don’t have a backup or wanted to provision a second slave such that it had no initial data.

A: If you had no backups or data, yes, you would need to re-provision with the parallel extractor in order to seed the target database.

Q: Would you do that with the original SCN? If it had been a month or two, is there a way to start at a more recent SCN (e.g. you have to re-run the setupCDC process)?

A: The best case is to have two MySQL slaves and when one fails, you re-provision it from the healthy one. This avoids setupCDC stage.

However, the replication can always be started from a specific event (SCN) provided that SCN is available in the Oracle undo log space.

Q: How does Tungsten handle Oracle’s CLOB and BLOB data types

A: Providing you are using asynchronous CDC these types are supported; for synchronous CDC these types are not supported by Oracle.

Q: Can different schemas in Oracle be replicated at different times?

A: Each schema is extracted by a separate service in Replicator, so they are independent.

Q: What is the size limit for BLOB or CLOB column data types?

A: This depends on the CDC capabilities in Oracle, and is not limited within Tungsten Replicator. You may want to refer to the Oracle Docs for more information on CDC: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28313/cdc.htm

Q: With different versions of Oracle e.g. enterprise edition and standard edition one be considered heterogeneous environments?

A: Essentially yes, although the nomenclature is really only a categorization, it does not affect the operation, deployment or functionality of the replicator. All these features are part of the open source product.

Q: Can a 10g database (master) send the data to a 11g database (slave) for use in an upgrade?

A: Yes.

Q: Does the Oracle replicator require the Oracle database to be in archive mode?

A: Yes. This is a requirement for Oracle’s CDC implementation.

Q: How will be able to revisit this recorded webinar?

A: Slides and a recording from today’s webinar will be available at http://www.slideshare.net/Continuent_Tungsten

 

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